Frozen Head State Park

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Birding

The Audubon Society recognizes Frozen Head as part of the South Cumberland Mountains Important Bird Area. Important Bird Areas, or IBA’s are sites that provide essential habitat for one or more species of bird.

Frozen Head supports high breeding populations of several Neotropical migrant birds, including the cerulean warbler, as well as breeding populations of a few high elevation species which are rare in Tennessee outside of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Acadian flycatcher, blue-gray gnatcatcher, northern parula and yellow-throated warbler and Louisiana waterthrush are common during spring and summer along the creek. Swainson's warblers have also occurred in this area. Check the fields and field edges for brown thrasher, American robin, and Eastern bluebird. Eastern wood pewee, red-eyed vireo and yellow-throated vireo, wood thrush, black-and-white warbler, ovenbird and scarlet tanager are common in the roadside forests. Cerulean warbler can occasionally be seen - or more often heard - from the main park road. They are much more numerous along many of the park's hiking trails. The park's breeding populations of veery, chestnut-sided warbler, black-throated blue warbler, blackburnian warbler, Canada warbler and rose-breasted grosbeak are only observable by hiking to higher elevations. Ruffed grouse can often be seen from the parks many hiking trails. The Natural Area is within the Cumberland Mountains Important Bird Area.  Over 130 species of birds have been observed throughout the year.